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Personal Project Guide

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Personal Project Guide




Student Name:_______________________________________

 

Teacher advisor:______________________________________






Asker International School Mission Statement

Asker International School will seek to assist each student to develop to his/her full potential, to become a versatile, effective and responsible citizen of the world. We will do this within a secure and stimulating environment, delivering curricular programmes developed and authorized by the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO), with English as the medium of instruction.




School values and beliefs

 

AIS does not wish to impose a particular system of belief on any member of the school: we will aim to create an atmosphere of freedom, tolerance and mutual respect for all forms of belief and non-belief, seeking to emphasize what unites us, and not what divides us. Our emphasis will be on mutual respect: each student is to be encouraged to experience and understand the diversity of cultural, religious and political systems with which they come into contact. As an international school, we will be committed to fostering international understanding, and an awareness in each student of issues such as peace, freedom, and care of the environment – issues which are of concern to us all as world citizens.



Introduction

 

Dear Students, Parents and Supervisors,

 

This handbook contains information and guidelines for students, mentors and supervisors. We consider that the effective use of the handbook is crucial for students to document their Personal Project fully to maximize their IB MYP achievement. Students should be using this book as a reference for whenever they are doing something related to the Personal Project.

 

We are excited about the opportunities that the Personal Project provides to our Grade 10 students. It allows students to explore, research and develop skills in a topic that is their passion which is not directly related to their daily school work and that they may not otherwise attempt.

 

Brent Jane

MYP co-ordinator and Personal Project leader

 

Table of Contents

 

The Nature of the MYP ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4

Aims ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4

The Role of the Supervisor ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4

The Role of Specialists/Mentors in the Community ……………………………………………………………… 4

Investigating & Planning the project ………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

Global contexts ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6

Identifying the Global context for the project ………………………………………………………………. 8

The Process Journal…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 10

Documenting the process ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 10

Creating Criteria for the product/outcome …………………………………………………………………….. 11

Examples of Criteria for the product/outcome ………………………………………………………………. 12

The Final Report ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13

Length of the Report ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 13

Submitting the Project for Assessment …………………………………………………………………………. 14

Selecting Process Journal extracts ………………………………………………………………………………… 14

Additional Guidance …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15

Using Assessment Criteria ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15

Objectives & Assessment Criteria…………………………………………………………………………………………… 16

Criterion A: Investigating ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 16

Criterion B: Planning ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….… 17

Criterion A: Taking Action ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 18

Criterion A: Reflecting ……………………………………………………………………………………………………... 19

Glossary & Command Terms ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 20



Nature of the MYP Personal Project

The Personal Project:

• encourages students to develop an area of personal interest;

• provides an excellent opportunity for students to produce a truly personal and often creative product or outcome; and

• should evolve around a challenge that motivates and interests the individual student.

 

Each student develops a Personal Project independently

 

Aims

The aims of the MYP Personal Project are to encourage and enable students to:

• participate in a sustained, self-directed inquiry within a global context;

• generate creative new insights and develop deeper understandings through in-depth investigation;

• demonstrate the skills, attitudes and knowledge required to complete a project over an extended period of time;

• communicate effectively in a variety of situations;

• demonstrate responsible action through, or as a result of learning; and

• appreciate the process of learning and take pride in their accomplishments.

 

The role of the supervisor

1. Each student has his or her own supervisor who has been allocated by the School.

2. The purpose of the supervisor is to support the student during the project.

3. The supervisor’s responsibilities are to:

• ensure the chosen MYP project topic satisfies appropriate legal and ethical standards with regard to health and safety, confidentiality, human rights, animal welfare and environmental issues;

• provide guidance and support to students in the process and completion of the project but not take over the project from the student;

• discuss options with the student, maintaining objectivity, ensuring the student’s ownership; • confirm the authenticity of the work submitted;

• contact the IB MYP Coordinator at the school for support or guidance as necessary; and

• assess the MYP project in the first instance using the criteria in this guide before standardisation by an assessment panel.

 

The role of Specialist/Mentors in the Community

Students may decide to seek out and use specialists or mentors within the community who facilitate access to research and evidence, provide information to extend skills and knowledge and model good practice. In these cases, the community member guides and supports the students throughout the process. It is important that students still receive guidance from their supervisor and the school relating to the project objectives and assessment. Parents, supervisors and the school should be aware of any legal requirements when using an external specialist in the interest of student safety.



Investigating & Planning the Project

The MYP Personal Project consists of three components:

1. A product/outcome

2. Process Journal

3. Report.

 

Personal Projects are developed and completed by individual students, but they may involve group work (e.g. a performed play).

 

Students need to identify a goal, based on areas or topics of interest to them. Project supervisors guide and advise students on the selection of topics for the project.

 

Students should document their thinking, their research process and the refining and development of their initial ideas. Students will develop an outline of the goal they wish to pursue, which will form the basis of the first meeting between the student and the supervisor.

 

Students should develop a goal that they can accomplish, but which challenges their knowledge, skills or techniques in an appropriate way. Goals should be achievable, based on the time and resources available.

 

The student may involve teachers and other appropriate adults as resources, but students must complete the project independently.

 

The table below illustrates some examples of challenging and highly challenging Personal Project goals.

 

Challenging goal

Highly challenging goal

A student documents his or her self-taught skills of photography.

A student documents his or her neighbourhood through a photography exhibition.

A student creates a durable bag using secondhand materials.

A student creates a range of bags using secondhand materials to exhibit at the local arts centre.

A student writes an article on a topic of interest for a journal (school/academic/special interest) and submits it to an audience.

A student writes and publishes an original book length feature on a topic of interest.




Global contexts

Global contexts direct learning towards independent and shared inquiry into our common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet. Using the world as the broadest context for learning, MYP projects can develop meaningful explorations of:

  • identities and relationships

  • orientation in space and time

  • personal and cultural expression

  • scientific and technical innovation

  • globalization and sustainability

  • fairness and development.

Students must identify one of these global contexts for their MYP project to establish the relevance of their inquiry (why it matters).

 

Consider the following questions as you choose a global context through which to focus their project.

  • What do I want to achieve through my personal project?

  • What do I want others to understand through my work?

  • What impact do I want my project to have?

  • How can a specific context give greater purpose to my project?

 

The choice of the global context will significantly shift the perspective of the MYP project. Tables 5 and 6 demonstrate the impact global contexts have on a topic or issue in the personal project.

 

Table 5 - Rap as a music genre

Global context

Examples

Identity and relationships

Examine the question, “Why does rap speak to me?”.

Orientation in space and time

Explore the development of rap as a style of music across continents.

Personal and cultural expression

Perform a rap song for peers and have a question-and answer session about the cultures that influenced its words and music.

Fairness and development

Explore how rap music became a way to express rebellion and seek social justice.





Table 6 - Solar energy devices

Global context

Examples

Scientific and technical innovation

Design a 3D model of a solar device with instructions for construction.

Orientation in space and time

Investigate how, in history, different cultures have made use of energy for different needs.

Globalization and sustainability

Debate Hervé Kempf’s ideas about “how the rich are destroying the Earth”.

 

Identifying the global context for the project

The global context chosen by the student provides a context for inquiry and research for the project. Students choose only one global context to define their goal. In most cases other global contexts may inform the project or offer other perspectives, but the focus on one context will present opportunities that emerge through (self-

imposed) limitations and give a specific focus to the project. The table below shows some examples of the use of each global context for an MYP Personal Project.



Global context

Examples of Personal Projects

Identities and Relationships

Students will explore identity; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities and cultures; what it means to be human.

• Two sides of social networking; an awareness campaign about digital citizenship and cyber bullying

• How online identities impact offline

relationships; a research essay

• Keeping culinary traditions; a video series following family recipes with historical relevance

• The effect of mass media on teenage

identity; a short film



Orientation in space and time

Students will explore personal histories; homes and journeys; turning points in humankind; discoveries; explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilizations from personal, local and global perspectives.



• The Euclidean space perspective of the universe; a 3D model.

• Explorers in search of a new world; immigration over the ages through visual texts.

• The Mayflower and the dream of religious freedom; a personal family history.

• Charting a family history through archives and a representational statue.



Personal and cultural expression

Students will explore the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

• Video games as a form of cultural expression; a short film using five video games that shows how they are an expression of our culture

• The art of Manga in Japanese culture;

a Japanese anime and a survey of the

understanding of my peers

• Culture and self-expression through dance at the local community arts centre; a performance



Scientific and technical innovation

Students will explore the natural world and its laws; the interaction between people and the natural world; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on communities and environments; the impact of environments on human activity; how humans adapt environments to their needs.



• Nano fibres build stronger bikes; a prototype bike with nano fibres

• What’s the matter with the anti-matter?; an informational talk

• Why are genetics and genomics important to my health?; a media presentation

• Can stem cells replace organ transplants?; an investigative report

Globalization and sustainability

Students will explore the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the

relationship between local and global processes; how local experiences mediate the global; the opportunities and tensions provided by world interconnectedness;

the impact of decision making on humankind and the environment.




• The struggle for water in developing

countries; an awareness campaign

• The impact of the financial crises of Europe and the European Economic Community on the United States; a visual presentation

• Education as the tool to change the future of Peru; a workshop for adults

• The role of the developing countries

in protecting the tropical rain forest; a

collection of slides

Fairness and development

Students will explore rights and responsibilities; the relationship between communities; sharing finite resources with other people and with other

living things; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.





• Supporting fair trade: Cocoa trade in Ghana; an awareness campaign for our school restaurant/cafeteria to promote fair trade

• Open-market economies and their role in fair trade; a talk for students

• Exploring the intersections of race and

inequality; a radio broadcast

• Asylum seekers and their right to live like us; a painting

Global contexts and MYP projects

 

The global context helps the student engage in a cycle of inquiry and a process that leads him or her from academic knowledge to thoughtful, principled action.

 





The Process Journal

Students are expected to document their processes in the process journal. In this way, they demonstrate their working behaviours and academic honesty.

 

Documenting the Process

The process journal is a generic term used to refer to the record of progress maintained by the student throughout the project. It can be written, visual, audio or a combination of these, and it may include both paper and electronic formats. In the use of electronic/digital media, students are strongly advised to back-up their work.

 

Students may develop their own format and design.

 

The process journal is personal to the student, in the sense that he or she is exploring ways of recording his or her processes. The student is responsible, through his or her use of the process journal, for producing evidence of addressing the four objectives to demonstrate achievement at the highest levels of the criteria.

 

A. Investigating

B. Planning

C. Taking Action

D. Reflecting

 

The process journal is:

The process journal is not:

• used throughout the project to document its development.

• to be kept up to date - record dates and times of action.

• an evolving record of intents, processes, accomplishments.

• a place to record initial thoughts and developments.

• brainstorming, possible lines of inquiry and further questions raised.

• a place for recording interactions with sources eg, teachers, supervisors, external contributors.

• a place to record selected, annotated and/or edited research and to maintain a bibliography (see student diary or appendices in this handbook)

• a place for storing useful information eg, quotations, pictures, ideas, photographs.

• a means of exploring ideas and solutions.

• a place for evaluating work completed.

• a place for reflecting on learning.

• devised by the student in a format that suits his or her needs eg, display folder, book, digital format.

• a record of reflections and formative feedback received.

• used on a daily basis (unless this is

useful for the student).

• written up after the process has been

completed.

• additional work on top of the project; it

is part of and supports the project.

• a diary with detailed writing about what

was done.

• a static document with only one format.

Students must bring their Process Journal to every meeting with their supervisor.

 

The Process Journal should include as relevant to the project topic:

• Research materials.

• Photos (explained and dated).

• Plans, designs, patterns.

• Interviews, questionnaires, surveys.

• Letters, emails.

• Materials, fabrics, colour samples.

• Actual costs/invoices/receipts.

• Video, CD, DVD, Power Point.



Creating Criteria for the Product/Outcome

As part of the goal, students must determine a final product/outcome of their project. The product/outcome might be an original work of art, a model, a business plan, a campaign, a blueprint or architectural drawing, an essay, a course of study, a debate, a film or some other work.

 

Students must define realistic criteria to measure the quality of the project’s final outcome or product. Working with their supervisor, students decide what constitutes a high-quality product/outcome. Students document the criteria in their process journal and use them to assess the final outcome or product.

 

For example:

• The goal may be to design a personal fitness programme to prepare for a half-marathon.

• The project is aiming to increase fitness through a training schedule, with the outcome of demonstrating increased fitness by successfully running a half-marathon.

• The criteria might include a proposed running schedule with interim projected running times, and the final running time the student hopes to achieve in the half-marathon.

• The outcome might be documented through a fitness chart, diary entries, running times and a series of photos of the actual marathon.

 

Usually, students will not be able to define the criteria until they have spent some time researching the goal, and criteria should only be determined once students have a clear understanding of what they want to achieve and the proposed product/outcome of their project.

 

Examples of Criteria for the Product/Outcome

 

• Form/appearance

• Function/purpose

• Expect cost/budget

• Time allocated/restrictions

• Target group/audience

• New skills to learn and/or and develop

• Available resources and materials

• Specifications - size, dimensions, quantity.

 

The Final Report

The report should be presented in identifiable sections, following the MYP project objectives - investigating, planning, taking action and reflecting. The report must include evidence for all the strands of all criteria.

 

The report, however creatively developed and presented, does not replace the product/outcome of the Personal Project. If the product/outcome of a Personal Project is in written form, such as an essay or novel, this is considered as distinct from the project report.

 

Ideally the report should be written but other formats (e.g. oral, visual, electronic or multimedia) can be negotiated with the Supervisor and the IB MYP Coordinator.

 

A written report aims to inform and explain the process of the Personal Project in a concise and succinct form and usually consists of sections with subheadings. Students must ensure that the report conforms to the structure as outlined above and meets the objectives and Assessment Criteria (refer to Submitting the Project for Assessment).

 

As the report is a component of the MYP Personal Project, students should plan their time carefully. Planning, drafting, rehearsing and preparing materials are all necessary steps, and students should be aware of the amount of time required to complete the report. Students should be careful to ensure that their report is a distinct component of the MYP Personal Project and is not a collection of process journal entries.

 

Length of the Report

• The length of the Personal Project report must be between a minimum of 1500 words and a maximum of 3500 words, not including the process journal, appendices and bibliography or reference list.

• If the product is of a written nature e.g. creative writing (a story book, poetry, book) cook book, significant scientific research on a topic, this is a separate component and not included in the 3500 word limit. In defining the goal the student with the supervisor will set achievable constraints on the size of such projects.

 

Submitting the Project for Assessment

Students must include:

• the Personal Project coversheet;

• the completed Academic Honesty Form;

• the Personal Project Journal;

• the product (unless too large or not relevant to submit);

• the report, including the following headings:

• Introduction

• A: Investigation

• B: Planning

• C: Taking Action

• D: Reflecting

• Reference List: An alphabetical list of only those sources that are cited in the Final Report.

• Bibliography: An alphabetical list of every source used to research the entire project; and

• 10 Journal Extracts.

 

*Note that the Bibliography and Reference List should include all types of sources (including people, businesses and organisations) and must adhere to the Harvard style of referencing.

 

Selecting Process Journal Extracts

For the Personal Project, students should carefully select evidence from their process journals to demonstrate development in all criteria. These extracts are submitted as appendices of the report or presentation at the conclusion of the project. The student should take responsibility for making the appropriate extracts available to the supervisor. Students working individually should select a maximum of 10 individual extracts to represent the key developments of the project. The student should select extracts that demonstrate how he or she has addressed each of the objectives, or annotate extracts to highlight this information.

 

An extract may include:

• visual thinking diagrams;

• bulleted lists;

• charts;

• short paragraphs;

• notes;

• timelines, action plans;

• annotated illustrations;

• annotated research;

• artifacts from inspirational visits to museums, performances, galleries;

• pictures, photographs, sketches;

• up to 30 seconds of visual or audio material;

• screenshots of a blog or website; and

• self and peer assessment feedback.

Materials directly relevant to the achievement of the project should also be included in the extracts as appropriate. For example, if the student has produced a questionnaire or survey that has been described and analysed in the report, he or she could include a segment of that completed survey.

 

An individual extract may include any of the formats that the student used to document the process. Extracts should simply be supporting evidence of the process and will not be individually assessed.

 

Additional Guidance

• Students may use any form of audio-visual support e.g. Video, CD, DVD, Power Point.

• Students must acknowledge their sources.

 

Using Assessment Criteria

Assessment for the MYP Personal Project is criterion-related, based on four equally weighted assessment criteria.



Criterion A

Investigating

Maximum 8

Criterion B

Planning

Maximum 8

Criterion C

Taking Action

Maximum 8

Criterion D

Reflecting

Maximum 8

 

MYP Personal Projects must assess all strands of all four assessment criteria. In the MYP, objectives correspond to Assessment Criteria. Each criterion has eight possible achievement levels (1–8), divided into four bands that generally represent limited (1–2); adequate (3–4); substantial (5–6); and excellent (7–8) performance. Each band has its own unique descriptor, which supervisors use to make “bestfit” judgments about students’ progress and achievement.















Objectives and Assessment Criteria

 

Criterion A: Investigating

Maximum: 8

In the Personal Project, students should be able to:

i. define a clear goal and a global context for the project, based on personal interests

ii. identify prior learning and subject-specific knowledge relevant to the project

iii. demonstrate research skills.



Achievement Level

Level descriptor

1-2

i. states a goal and a global context for the project, based on personal interests, but this may be limited in depth or accessibility


ii. identifies prior learning and subject-specific knowledge, but this may be limited in occurrence or relevance


iii. demonstrates limited research skills.

3-4

i. outlines a basic and appropriate goal and a global context for the project, based on personal interests


ii. identifies basic prior learning and subject-specific knowledge relevant to some areas of the project


iii. demonstrates adequate research skills.

5-6

i. develops a clear and challenging goal and a global context for the project, based on personal interests


ii. identifies prior learning and subject-specific knowledge generally relevant to the project


iii. demonstrates substantial research skills.

7-8

i. develops a clear and highly challenging goal and a global context for the project, based on personal interests


ii. identifies prior learning and subject-specific knowledge that is consistently highly relevant to the project


iii. demonstrates excellent research skills.

Criterion B: Planning

Maximum: 8

In the Personal Project, students should be able to:

i. develop criteria for the product/outcome

ii. plan and record the development process of the project

iii. demonstrate self-management skills.

 

Achievement Level

Level descriptor

1-2

i. develops limited criteria for the product/outcome


ii. presents a limited or partial plan and record of the development process of the project


iii. demonstrates limited self-management skills.

3-4

i. develops adequate criteria for the product/outcome


ii. presents an adequate plan and record of the development process of the project


iii. demonstrates adequate self-management skills.

5-6

i. develops substantial and appropriate criteria for the product/outcome


ii. presents a substantial plan and record of the development process of the project


iii. demonstrates substantial self-management skills.

7-8

i. develops rigorous criteria for the product/outcome


ii. presents a detailed and accurate plan and record of the development process of the project


iii. demonstrates excellent self-management skills.










Criterion C: Taking Action

Maximum: 8

In the Personal Project, students should be able to:

i. create a product/outcome in response to the goal, global context and criteria

ii. demonstrate thinking skills

iii. demonstrate communication and social skills.



Achievement Level

Level descriptor

1-2

i. creates a limited product/outcome in response to the goal, global context and criteria


ii. demonstrates limited thinking skills


iii. demonstrates limited communication and social skills

3-4

i. creates a basic product/outcome in response to the goal, global context and criteria


ii. demonstrates adequate thinking skills


iii. demonstrates adequate communication and social skills.

5-6

i. creates a substantial product/outcome in response to the goal, global context and criteria


ii. demonstrates substantial thinking skills


iii. demonstrates substantial communication and social skills.

7-8

i. creates an excellent product/outcome in response to the goal, global context and criteria


ii. demonstrates excellent thinking skills


iii. demonstrates excellent communication and social skills.








Criterion D: Reflecting

Maximum: 8

In the Personal Project, students should be able to:

i. evaluate the quality of the product/success of the outcome against their criteria

ii. reflect on how completing the project has extended their knowledge and understanding of the topic and the global context

iii. reflect on their development as IB learners through the project.

 

Achievement Level

Level descriptor

1-2

i. presents a limited evaluation of the quality of the product/success of the outcome against his or her criteria


ii. presents limited reflection on how completing the project has extended his or her knowledge and understanding of the topic and the global context


iii. presents limited reflection on his or her development as an IB learner through the project.

3-4

i. presents a basic evaluation of the quality of the product/success of the outcome against his or her criteria


ii. presents adequate reflection on how completing the project has extended his or her knowledge and understanding of the topic and the global context


iii. presents adequate reflection on his or her development as an IB learner through the project.

5-6

i. presents a substantial evaluation of the quality of the product/success of the outcome against his or her criteria


ii. presents substantial reflection on how completing the project has extended his or her knowledge and understanding of the topic and the global context


iii. presents substantial reflection on his or her development as an IB learner through the project.

7-8

i. presents an excellent evaluation of the quality of the product/success of the outcome against his or her criteria


ii. presents excellent reflection on how completing the project has extended his or her knowledge and understanding of the topic and the global context


iii. presents excellent reflection on his or her development as an IB learner through the project.

Glossary & Command Terms

 

Glossary of terms

 

Terms

Definitions

Bibliography

An alphabetical list of every source used to research the project.

Criteria

Specific elements the Personal Project product/outcome must meet to be a quality outcome, as defined by the student.

List of references

An alphabetical list of only those sources that are cited in the project presentation or report.

Outcome

The end result of the student’s Personal Project, used particularly where the project has resulted in a non-tangible result or result that has various aspects to it, for example, an awareness-raising campaign.

Process journal

A generic term to refer to the documentation that students develop during the process of completing the MYP project.

Product

The end result of the student’s Personal Project used particularly where the project has resulted in a tangible artifact such as a sculpture, film, story or model.

Report

A spoken or written account of something that one has observed, heard, done or investigated, which aims to inform, as clearly and succinctly as possible.



Command Terms



Terms

Definitions

Create

To evolve from one’s own thought or imagination, as a work or an invention.

Define

Give the precise meaning of a word, phrase, concept or physical quantity

Demonstrate

Make clear by reasoning or evidence, illustrating with examples or practical application.

Develop

To improve incrementally, elaborate or expand in detail; evolve to a more advanced or effective state.

Formulate

Express precisely and systematically the relevant concept(s) or argument(s).

Identify

Provide an answer from a number of possibilities; recognize and state briefly a distinguishing fact or feature.

Justify

Give valid reasons or evidence to support an answer or conclusion.

Outline

Give a brief account or summary.

Present

Offer for display, observation, examination or consideration.

State

Give a specific name, value or other brief answer without explanation or calculation.

 

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Johan Drengsruds Vei 60, 1383 Asker. Tel: +47 908 90 609 E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.